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is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
. this is "your money." only in america can you grow talent like this. we like to think of america as innovation nation. but the numbers reveal a slogan that should read, "part-time america." >>> call it the do you want fries with that economy? part-time jobs have exploded, nearly doubling since 2007. 8.2 million americans who would rather have a full-time job punching the time clock part-time instead. president obama admits there is more work to do, but is his signature achievement, obamacare, partly to blame? >> more companies have said because of this law they'll have to shift full-time workers to part-time. >> reporter: team retailer now the latest company demoting some full-time workers to part-time not because of obamacare, it's just good business. the teamsters sending a letter to world leaders saying they could destroy the foundation of the 40-hour work week that is the backbone of america middle class. a middle class in trouble with 14,000 other americans forced to take part-time gigs since march. whatever the reason, the numbers don't lie. is america becoming a nation of part-timers? t
about coming to america. wide spread furry and december stress in distress over this in australia. >> there really has. disbelief, shock. chris was a rising star having the time of his life over in the united states. we've all heard about gun violence in america, but this really brought it home. parents in australia who may have children on scholarships in the u.s. and students themselves, just out of disbelief that could happen to one of ours. this is the front page in melbourne here today, "the herold son." it says the team's american police shot our star. it's senseless and the reaction from the family as well as reporting from that baseball club just north on melbourne here. family, friends and team mates and people from the local baseball club have been down there this week. terribly sad, they are placing a baseball with tributes, flowers on the home base. his mother and father held back tears and described chris as another normal kid. he loved baseball and the game since he was 15 years old and loved it because he wanted to go to college in the u.s., piers, and saw this was
with violence in egypt. bret stephens and peter beinart disagree as usual. >>> then, is america overregulated? does the government have altogether too much of a say in how we live our lives? i'll ask the man who put many of the obama administration's regulations in place, cass sunstein. >>> also underneath the violence, is the arab world the new start-up society? that's what an american venture capitalist believes. and while we're at innovation, is north korea going to beat apple at its own game? obviously no, but i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. if there is one crisis that both the american left and right agree is real, it is of declining mobility. the american dream is at heart that someone no matter his or her background can make it in this country. a few weeks ago, four economists at harvard and the university of california at berkeley released a path-breaking study of mobility within the united states. and last week, the "journal of economic perspectives" published a series of essays tackling the question from an international perspective. the research is careful and nuance
.vitac.com >>> tonight, pot in america. >> i think its deserves some respect, so i always call it cannabis. >> the biggest cash crop in the u.s. should it be legal? should it be taxed? is it a gateway drug that leads to addiction. >> without question, i think legalizing marijuana would be a huge mistake. >> taking you to the front lines of the battle, the beverly hills woman that said lighting up makes them better moms. >> i feel like i'm more interactive with my children. >> and i ask dr. sanjay gupta how dangerous is it really? >> every 19 minutes someone dies of prescription drug overdose but doesn't happen with marijuana. >> and what really happens inside a medical dispensary. >> the clinic is run like a typical health clinic. it's beautiful inside. >> this is the special report gone to pot, america's marijuana obsession. >>> good evening. the fight over pot grows, so does the use. recently washington d.c. opened the first medical marijuana dispensary, with other states that legalized it more medical uses. should it be a crime? we'll take a closer look tonight. >>> also, dr. sanjay gup
as highly discriminatory. what politicians decide to do about it but putting corporate america in a tough spot. an article in the new yorker this week titled "why the olympic sponsors should take action on gay rights." richard is a political strategist and gay rights advocate. bob zito is with us and he helped shape the brands of sony, new york stock exchange, bristol-myers squib. you write the participation of corporate sponsors mostly benefits the russian government. it's not required for american athletes to succeed. they sign deals before president putin signed that law. what do you think these corporate sponsors need to do now? >> i think the point is, right, that no one wants to penalize the athletes who worked so hard to succeed and most people believe we should participant. the corporate sponsors because they donate sod much money to the games, that they have earned the right to insist that russia comply with the policies that these corporations, most of these corporations have for their own employees of non-discrimination. i think that they have a lot of -- they have the power of
to america's reality. millions still feel like they are missing out on the recovery. so when will it be their turn? christine romans has answers. "your money" starts now. >>> the american dream, happiness and prosperity. a house, a great job, maybe a couple of kids and time to enjoy it all. the great recession is behind us, but the recovery isn't so great. i'm christine romans and this is "your money." first, housing. goldman sachs says all cash deals are half the market right now. wealthy investors, buyers from china, canada, south america, pumping up recent housing data. average americans may be getting priced out. in the second quarter, when you look at this, more than two-thirds of all the homes sold in the u.s. were affordable. for families making $56,000 a year, that's the median u.s. income. but you can see how that affordability is falling. next, the labor market. nearly 5 million net new jobs have been created near the end of the recession four years ago, but look at the jobs that were lost. mostly middle wage jobs right here, and the jobs we're creating, mostly lowe
on washington, has been credited for changing mainstream america, white america's view of the civil rights movement and the fight against segregation. is this your experience? do you think that's true? >> i do believe that's true, not because of correspondents who were covering it but because of the nature of the times, the development of television, the pervasive use of television. television was just coming into most homes in the late '50s and '60s, been around before then. but there's no question that television's coverage of the civil rights movement, taking into people's living rooms what was happening, not some newspaper description or some highly censored or sanitized view, it brought the reality of the viciousness of the opposition to civil rights, particularly in the deep south, into people's living rooms. and then the eloquence and courage of d king and those who worked with him, such as john lewis, now a congressman, people could see and hear for themselves. television was the instrument. before television it was easy to deny how much violence there was. it was easy to overlook
in the united states of america. i'm going to to be focused on that particular issue. right now what i needed to do is to make sure schools open on time and safely. not withstand something of the personnel reductions. the focus has to be on education, young people, what goes on in school, after school, on the weekends, during the summer, and so we beefed up many of our after-school programs as well as summer programming to make sure our kids are safe and they are learning and they are working with caring, nurturing adults. >> okay. mayor landrieu, i want to get this school question out of the way as well. i want to talk about -- specifically about other things. i want to ask the same question. as new orleans is building a new prison, is this our new reality? giving up on schools to make room for teens who will inevitably end up behind bars? >> you know, it is one of the things that we face in this nation. we are bogey to have cadillac prisons and not have schools that work. we have to get priorities right. you are never getting to the issue and mayor nutter and i want to talk about tonight. w
. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. [off screen] hthere you are. [speaking german] hi, grandpa! [off screen] give me a kiss! [speaking mandarin] what do you think? do you like it? [off screen] happy birthday! can you see that? [speaking polish] [off screen] did he apologize? [off screen] thanks, micah! [off screen] bye, guys. bye. see ya. oh my god! every day, more people connect face to face on the iphone than any other phone. i miss you. [ male announcer ] this summer, savor every second of vacation. but get your own cookie. enjoy a fresh-baked chocolate chip cookie at check-in and more, with rates as low as $99 per night at a doubletree. book now at doubletree.com/getaway. >>> get on the ground. do not move. get on the ground. >> it's just him. okay. it's just him. >> keep going. >> u
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
that there are states in america now that have fully legalized the use of marijuana but for recreational and medical use. are you tempted to take vivian out of new jersey and go somewhere like colorado, for example, where it's all completely legal? >> absolutely. it's a decision that we discuss every single day. we actually decided after christie's announcement on friday that we were going to give ourselves this week to not talk about it, regroup, and then see where we are next week. but a year is a year of seizures and only if we have to move their temporarily to get vivian on the treatment as soon as possible, that's what we'll do. we're not going to stop at anything to help our daughter. >> and how is she at the moment, would you say, brian? >> today she was pretty good. yesterday she had a bad day. every day it's very intermittent. sometimes she'll have a good day, partial day. right now she's doing good because she's upstairs sleeping in her crib. >> she's a moody 2-year-old. ask us by the minute how she's doing. some days are better than others. we like that actually because that's a normal side t
in america. something my next guest knows a lot about, perhaps more than most. new york police commissioner ray kelly who joins me. commissioner kelly, welcome to you and congratulations first of all in the largest gun bust in new york's history. 254 illegal guns that you seized this week. i want to come to that later. we'll start with the two appalling gun incidents in america. first this young australian student, here to play baseball, who was targeted by randomly bored teenagers and gunned down to hi death. what's your reaction to that story? >> it is horrific. no question about it. it underscores the fact there's way too many guns abroad in america. we have as many as 300 million guns in this country. just an incredible number. unfortunately, you are going to see events like this take place when you have that number of weapons. we think that we're in need of sensible gun laws, federal laws. the case that you mentioned in new york and we're going to talk about it, but it cries out for federal gun trafficking laws. we simply don't have that. it also cries out for background -- universal
guns you sized this week. we'll start with the two appalling gun incidents in america chasm the first, the young australian student here in america to play baseball who was apparently randomly targeted and gunned down to his death. what do yaw make. >> it was horrific and i think it under scores the fact there is way too many guns abroad in america. we have as many as 300 million guns in this country, and it's just an incredible number. unfortunately, you're going to see events like this take place when you have that number on weapons. we think that we're in need of sensible gun laws, federal laws, the case that you mentioned in new york, we won't talk about it but calls out for gun trafficking laws. we simply don't have that. it also cries out for background, universal background checks on people who want to get guns. i mean, this is common sense but it doesn't look like either of these thing wills happen in the near term. >> this other incident in decatur, this georgia school where 28-year-old suspect michael brandon hill, apparently had 500 rounds of ammunition and an ak-47. his br
to diminish health care across america. >> just to follow up on that, you can't talk about elections, but you can talk about your party, that's what you do at the heritage foundation. house speaker john boehner also isn't too enthralled with your idea that obamacare be defunded. >> the heritage foundation doesn't represent republicans or democrats. >> you personally, what do you think? >> what we think is obamacare is clearly a law that's going to hurt the american people. the president is not going to implement it fairly. we're saying this thing should be defunded, it should not go forward, the president is arbitrarily implementimenting t. >> governor dean, i want to play something that senator dean said about obama's vice president. >> it was the best decision that i ever made politically because i love this guy. because he's got heart, and he cares for his people and he fights for what he believes in. and he's got some scranton in him. >> that sounds like a soft endorsement looking ahead to 2016. would the door still be open for joe biden to run and not hillary clinton? >> let me get a lit
of the sydney, australia herold. they call america easy access to guns but home conservative critics see it through a racial lenls. two of the suspects is african american, the youngest of whom james edwards has a number of racial tweets to his name. 90% of people are nasty he writes in one and hash tag hate them and with my "n" words when it comes to taking lives. like i said, racially inflamed tor -- antiinflammatory. here is a late breaking fact from local authorities. i spoke just a short time ago with the district attorney handling this case. >> i don't believe that this is a racial crime at all. i have nothing in any of my files, any of the paperwork, audio recordings we have that would suggest that christopher lane was killed either because of his race or his nationality. >> that's the chief prosecutor but again, his word likely won't be the last word. we'll debate the question shortly. >>> first, more on suspects james edward s and the question of another motive, gang initiation. >> reporter: if he was such a good kid, top athlete and personality how is he charged with felony fir
america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. >> but is it? taking on critics and talking tough about the nsa's snooping. >>> we begin with breaking news, the manhunt for james dimaggio, a pair fitting the description was seen in a remote area of idaho. that's where his car was found and paul joins me from san diego. a discovery of this car indicated they may be hiding in this remote area of idaho, possibly camping. tell me more. >>> well, piers, that was always the concern of detectives here is that he was a bit of an outdoorsman, mr. dimaggio and would head to the back country. indeed, when they found the car it was covered in brush and pried off the license plates. they identified it by the vin number. let's listen about the discovery. >> the blue nissan versa was discovered covered in brush. the license plates had been removed, but local law enforcement in the area were able to confirm through the vin number that the vehicle did belong to dimaggio. >> so not only did they discover the car, but also, again, a single rider on horseback reportedly saw hanna, the 16-year-old and
to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. to get our adt security system. and one really big reason -- the house next door. our neighbor's house was broken into. luckily, her family wasn't there, but what if this happened here? what if our girls were home? and since we can't monitor everything 24/7, we got someone who could. adt. [ male announcer ] while some companies are new to home security, adt has been helping to save lives for over 135 years. we have more monitoring centers, more of tomorrow's technology right here today, and more value. 24/7 monitoring against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide starting at just over $1 a day. and now get adt installed for just $99. isn't your family worth america's number-one security company? current adt customers ca
system in america should have picked you up earlier? >> yeah, absolutely, agree. i've spent a lot of time thinking about that in frustration and anger that i never got to know those things growing up my whole life about my biological parents. who wouldn't want to know both of their parents were mentally ill, in and out of mental institutions and schizophrenia and things like that. that's something i should have known from an early age to go to the right type of professional and doctor to get myself checked out. but i never knew growing up so that's a big deal to me. >> when you see the mass shootings in places like aurora and the movie theater with james holmes and adam lanza as sandy hook, do you recognize from everything you've read about these two shooters, similarities in the way perhaps you were thinking at the time that you committed your atrocity? >> absolutely. whenever these happen, whenever these incidents happen there is several things that pop into my mind because i've been there. i know there was psychological issues involved. these people were not right, obviously. at least
and ads for you. so why is the u.s. government looking over your shoulder. >> america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused on above all finding the information necessary to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> rod is the former director of the national cyber security center. is the message here we shouldn't put anything sensitive in e-mail or online, there is no expectation for privacy in what we do in a very technology driven world? >> sure. anything you put online is definitely at risk. i'll say that. you can make some choices better than others to try protect your privacy. if you're e-mailing online you are taking a risk that could be disclosed. >> we've all done it, gone through pages and pages of conditions for new software and click accept. that's what happened in this episode. >> what are you going to do to us? >> everything you agreed to in the itunes conditions. >> we didn't read them. >> right. who just agrees to something they don't read. we get the point. a rt of people do that. we know a lot of people do every ti
the baseball game last night. we'll talk about what this means for america's pastime. plus, you may love that morning cup of coffee and then some. but how much is too much? that's just ahead. can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&♪ hooking up the countryess. whelping business run ♪ ♪ trains! they haul everything, safely and on time. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people, making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big count
. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> in california, authorities are trying to solve a mystery that has a family and a school community on edge. they're looking for a popular pennsylvania high school math teacher who vanished during a hiking trip to mammoth lakes. 39-year-old matthew green would have started classes tomorrow but he hasn't been seen or heard from since mid-july. >> i want to be hopeful but yet at this point it's so hard to be hopeful. >> reporter: it's hard because her brother matthew green is missing. the avid 39-year-old hiker and high school math teacher from pennsylvania who loved being outdoors vanished more than a month ago while vacationing in the mountains of mammoth lakes, california. his family said he went
immediately. disturbing photos showing the brothers in a snake cage. >>> and gone to pot, america's marijuana obsession, takes a surprising turn on the nation's capital and here at cnn. dr. sanjay gupta fills us in and has a surprising revelation of his own. >>> we begin with breaking news on the massive manhunt for james dimaggo. accused of murdering a woman and kidnapping her two children. there was a car spotted in northern california. law enforcement officers from multiple agencies on the lookout for the vehicle. disturbing vehicle, the champed remains found inside the home of dimaggio are consistent of an 8-year-old boy, the same age of ethan. joining me is jane velez-mitchell . welcome to you jane. >> thank you. >> awful story, this. >> horrible. >> it would seem the logical assumption from what we're now learning is that possibly the mother, christine anderson and this 8-year-old boy ethan may have died in the fire at the house that belonged to dimaggio and he's on the loose somewhere with the daughter, hanna anderson, who is 16. >> yeah and there is breaking news. there were two possi
america lost its top credit ratings. average rates for a 30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.68% this year. the low this year in january. that is one incredible surge higher. the reason for the rise the feds soon to cutback of easy money. >>> death wish. nidal hasan, the fort hood shooter admits he killed 13 people. he didn't call a single witness in his own defense which rested today. if hasan is convicted he faces the death penalty. that may be exactly what he wants. outfront tonight ed at fort hood. >> reporter: nidal hasan had his chance to put on his defense today. he passed. nidal hasan is on a self-glorified march to the execution chamber. there hasn't been a military execution in more than 50 years. hasan appears determined to change that. >> i think major hasan may be the first military defendant in a long time to be put to death. >> reporter: the arm psychiatrist has watched prosecutors persuade a jury to sentence him to death. he refused to call any witnesses to tell his story. hasan shows little interest in sparing his own life. the reason could very well be found in these medi
. >>> joining me now is john watch -- walsh. host of america's most wanted. fascinating interview, painting a very different picture, sort of kind of persona that we seem to be dealing with with a mass killer and kidnapper. what do you make of it? >> well, he's certainly hoping it isn't his friend and we live in such a society that both you and i would say this man is accused of kidnapping this girl and murdering her mother and probably her brother. we should stay accused by the fbi and police say he is pedophile that kidnapped a 16-year-old girl and the main suspect in the murder e of her mother and the murder of her 8-year-old brother, although they haven't determined those are his remains yet. so it seems the law enforcement agencies and the state of california, which issued the amber alert think he's the number one suspect. let's not forget about jerry sandusky who was sodomizing an 11-year-old boy in the locker room and nobody could believe it was jerry sandusky. >> right. >> ariel castro who kept three girls in a house for ten years, his little 14-year-old daughter was gina dee jesus
our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> celebrity therapist dr. phil mcgraw is in a bit of hot water over this twice asking -- if a girl is drunk, is it okay to have sex with her? reply yes or no to dr. phil with the #teamsaccused. dr. phil's show says it was intended to invoke discussion, but it ended up doing something very different. >>> so let's bring in torrie dunnen with the details. torrie, this is very upsetting to a lot of people. you this was quickly deleted, but the storm of reaction had already started. we did get a statement from the dr. phil show clarifying this was not a personal post from dr. phil. we are told he is upset and deleted it the second he saw it. the show apologized saying the question was ill-advised be it drugs, alcohol, age or mental ill
was never evident in the 911 call that has riveted america. >> he just went outside and started shooting. >> reporter: his first shot was in the floor just a few feet away. >> he actually took the shot to allow me and the other person that was in there to know that this was not a game and that he was not playing, and that he was serious. >> reporter: she also knew the lives of 800 students hung in the balance. >> and he actually went to that door with the gun drawn to start shooting. then i started talking to him saying, come back in, stay with me. don't go anywhere, stay in here. >> reporter: so began one of the most frightening and fascinating negotiations ever recorded. >> he said to tell them to back off. he didn't want the didkids. he wants the police. so back off. >> reporter: the toughest thing was watching the man methodically loading the gun. >> he had bullets everywhere, so i knew in that last call, he was going to go. he had loaded up to go. >> reporter: yet instead of feeling fear or anger, tuff said she felt compassion, recalling her own personal heartbreaks, even contemplat
a terrorist attack in benghazi. you got to take this seriously and understand that america is under attack and you've got to take this pro actively and make some hard decisions that maybe aren't as politically correct but would create the safety and environment we need in those embassies and consulates around the world. >> before i let you go, congressman, on the subject of egypt, what's your understanding in terms of whether or not the u.s. has suspended or cut off aid to egypt? what's your understanding? >> i have no idea. to reach into american people's pockets and take their money and say we're going to give it to the egyptians given the chaos that's going on there, that is not something that i can support. i see no coherent policy, nor have i, from the obama administration, from secretary clinton, i don't see it from secretary kerrey. what is our strategy? what has it been since the fall and the changes there in egypt? i just don't see it. i don't understand it. i'd love for somebody to try to explain it. >> i would as well. thank you, congressman jason chaffetz, republican of utah. >
to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> oh, unstoppable at least for a while the kiss noticed around the world. two russian runners sharing an embrace after winning their race in moscow over the weekend. but the women say, hold on. they say the story is all wrong. nischelle turner joins us now with more. >> well, first of all, how did i know you were going to be playing that song, carol. i think most people thought that is what was going on when we saw that kiss. but given the current climate in russia the concern over gay athletes might be treated during the upcoming winter olympics in that country. this story has really resonated around the world, despite the denials of the women involved. now, bear with me on these pronunciations. russian sprinters rasova were part of the team who won the women's 4 by 4 relay and beat
've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> tonight a story that is raising all kinds of troubling questions on two continents. the shooting death of christopher lane in the small oklahoma town of duncan gunned down while jogging, targeted by teenage teenagers, 15, 16, 17. two charged with first degree murder, the driver less charges. said one according to police quote we were bored and didn't have anything to do, so we decided to kill somebody. lane was gunned down while jogging. he was laying in a ditch. the woman on the phone with 911. >> i hear no sirens. i see no lights. oh my gosh, how long is it going to be? ma'am, all i know is they are coming. i can't make them go any father. i've got them on the way. >> if you don't hurry, he's gone. >> they are coming, ma'am. i can't -- >> okay. >> i can
of this new network, al jazeera america, a part of the cutter based news network that gained notoriety for airing osama bin laden's anti-american videos after 9/11. the network's executives are well aware of its perception problem but they say that's going to disappear once you see their programming and they have been aggressively hiring high profile american journalists and opening bureaus in cities around the country. joining me to discuss the latest player in cable news here in washington, michael calderone, media reporter for the huffington post and edward fell 17 thaul, managing editor for time.com. welcome to you both. >> thanks. >> before we start, i should mention that al jazeera also accepted our invitation for both its interim ceo and its president of news to join us today, but then it cancelled. so moving on here, edward, let me start with you. there's so much competition now in cable news, including planned or already on the air networks from china, russia, univision with abc, fox just started a sports network. is there room for another news network? >> i think it's a great
of america rearing its ugly head again and to get to your point, when the games start lasting the time to fly from here in atlanta to mars, the people will be screaming about instant replay. >> all right. we'll have to see about that but the league claims it can review a umpire's call in less than two minutes. do you think that's realistic? >> let's say, for instance, that's the truth. all right. say if that's the true, what they're not telling us, the supporters of instant replay are all the other horror stories. for instance, each manager gets three challenges. but if a manager wins the challenge, he gets another challenge. and then another challenge. so that's more time right there. the pitcher, all right, during these challenges, the pitcher is not warming up or barely warming up. he wants to warm up after the decision is made. that's more time and then the other thing is, even though they're saying that you're not allowed to argue after these challenges are decided, we all know that arguing is in the dna of your average baseball person. these games will never end. >> look at football. al
, billionaires have gone shopping in america's newsrooms. >> watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters, bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned "the washington post" lead by it's publisher kathryn graham now the legacy in the future of one of the most important newspapers rest in the hands of one billionaire, amazon found jeff b bezos. gives new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> the "post" now follows other major newspapers. "the wall street journal" bought by murdoch and "the boston globe." >> i think what people are forgetting when we're talking about billionaires taking over the media, that's not exactly new. >> william randolph everyoherst how wealth -- >> i expect to lose a million dollars next year. you know, at the rate of a million dollars a year i'll have to close this place in 60 years. >> something bezos has in common. remaking the selling the news is next. >> bezos can spend an enormous amount of money on "the washington post" without really taking t
're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. seeing how exactly this happened that they allegedly shot this 22-year-old innocent man in the back and killed him. what else did you see on that surveillance video? story behind it. test [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. >>> our fifth story "outfront" death of a legend, best selling a
have new details tonight about planned terror attacks on america. u.s. officials have discovered an electronic meeting between more than 20 al qaeda top leaders and they did that by following the internet trail of an al qaeda courier. now, this is according to reporting by the daily beast. you'll recall it was that meeting of al qaeda leaders that prompted the obama administration to issue an unprecedented terror alert ordering the closing of nearly two dozen american embassies in the mideast and north africa. josh roggen is the reporter that broke the story. josh, let me start with this, when you hear the word courier and al qaeda you think of the capture of osama bin laden, a physical courier driving the car that they were able to follow, so we've heard about this before. but this is an electronic trail, that's how they were able to find this. how do they do it? >> so, here's what happened, after a seven-hour internet conference between all of these leaders, the details of that conference, the minutes of it, were given to this courier and he then took it and tried to send it ar
as the problem is, this is something that is going to require america's attention, hopefully the entire international community's attention. >> well that was obviously, an important one, the president. breaking news here. >> a former colleague of yours. >> what i was going to play, is democrat elliott engel, the top democrat on the foreign affairs committee and bob corker, senator, republican. both of them saying that we can't wait. we can't wait for congress to come bang and authorize this. there has to be action. and corker said he's talked to the white house and he thinks that action could happen relatively soon. what are you hearing and do you agree with that? >> i think it very well could happen soon and i think that's the message that the assad regime already has, my suspicion they're now willing to allow u.n. inspectors in, they think in the absence of doing that, that action could be imminent. and this helps them buy some time. i think you know the white house has drawn a red line. and in terms of the credibility of the white house, the cost of not acting now i think exceeds the
threats. and later in the fall, i'll address the implications of these issues for america's global leadership and our moral standing around the world. >> reporter: and erin, if you heard hillary clinton there say that the speech coming up next month in september is going to be on national security issues, that is going to be september 10th, in philadelphia. she's going to be receiving an award there from none other than jeb bush. so that will certainly get the 2016 talk going. and to think that hillary clinton is going to be talking about this balance between national security and civil liberties sounds a lot like the conversation that a lot of people are having around the country right now. it is going to be very interesting to watch. >> oh, it sure is. and that timing, of course, would certainly underline that she is running. thanks very much to jim acosta. >>> still outfront, waves of sexual harassment claims, but the mayor of san diego refuses to step down. here's the question, how many people knew about his behavior all the way along? >>> and then, the hyperloop. this is the s
.com every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. a quarter million tweeters is beare tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. >>> let's take a quick look at some of the top stories in "the situation room." san diego tv stations are reporting the city's mayor, bob filner, is planning to resign. san diego city council will just need to sign off on a proposed mediation agreement before it goes into effect. 18 women have accused filner of sexual harassment. filn
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